Education Building

Education Building

Constructed by the Ivy Creek Foundation (ICF) in 1997, the ICF Education Building is an all-weather facility of sustainable design for day and evening use. This facility has allowed ICF to broaden the scope of its public programs, provide a year-round facility for training of volunteer school guides, and enabled the Foundation to develop programs to enhance its School Tour program.

Availability to Outside Groups

The Education Building is available to state and local community organizations for environmental meetings and workshops.

If your organization would like to book the Education Building, please contact our staff about availability. Our rental fee schedule is:

  • Partner non-profits & agencies, uncharged meetings—Folded into Organization Membership.
  • Partner non-profits & agencies, fundraising/charged events—10% of the door
  • Non-partner non-profits & agencies, uncharged meetings—$100/event
  • Non-partner non-profits & agencies, fundraising/charged events—20% of the door

Personal Events—This service is only available to Ivy Creek Foundation individual members at the Contributing level or higher. Please call if you are an Ivy Creek member and would like to book the space.

Please consult the RULES for using the Education Building before inquiring as to its availability, as well as the calendar of availability .  When confronted with competing requests for specific days and times, ICF will give priority to those events and organizations which promote the interests and goals that most closely align with ICF’s mission and vision, but staff is willing to work with your organization to find alternate times.

Natural History Library

In August 2008, long-time Ivy Creek supporter Ted Scott donated his life-long collection of natural history books (with link to Excel spread sheet). Appointments can be made to explore this collection and other resources by emailing director@ivycreekfoundation.org. Please see: List of Natural History Books (PDF, 59K).

A Model of Sustainable Architecture

Located inconspicuously behind the Quiet Observation Area, the Ivy Creek Foundation Education Building is a rustic, one-story structure capable of seating 65 people. The design includes passive solar features backed by a geothermal heating and cooling system, high performance windows, and the use of non-toxic materials. Slate used in the countertops and roof was mined locally. In addition to the oak timber frame structure, the wood paneled interior and hand made tables and cabinets represent eight different native species of wood sustainably harvested and donated by Northland Forest Products.

The building is disability accessible and located off an existing paved walkway.

Design and Craftsmanship

The facility was designed by ICF president Dan Bieker who served along with Don Charlebois as general contractors for the project. Don Charlebois of Woodworks designed and hand built several features of fine craftsmanship for the building.

The Education Building was completed in August, 1997 and held its first public program to a capacity crowd.

A Native Landscape

In 1998, the Education Building was landscaped with native trees and shrubs donated by local nurseries. Renowned landscape architect Ian Robertson and Susan Viemeister donated the design and landscape drawings used for the project. See: Landscaping for Wildlife at Ivy Creek Natural Area (PDF, 195K). See also: article in the Daily Progress.

A beautiful stone wall framing the front of the Building was made possible thanks to the Garden Club of Virginia’s Commonwealth Award, for which the Ivy Creek Foundation was chosen in 1998. The local Rivanna Garden Club nominated the project for this prestigious award.

Recreating a native woodland wildflower garden

In 2001, Phil Stokes undertook the task of landscaping the area behind the rock wall with native wildflowers and shrubs. Stokes used plants rescued from development projects as well as some from his own garden collection.

See: Partial Diagram and list of plants (PDF, 1.49M) found in the Ivy Creek rock wall garden.